The Nizkor Project: Remembering the Holocaust (Shoah)

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Newsgroups: soc.history,soc.culture.jewish,soc.culture.magyar,soc.culture.polish,soc.culture.romanian
Subject: Holocaust Calendar: October 23
Followup-To: alt.revisionism
Organization: The Nizkor Project
X-Remember: http://www.nizkor.org

[Follow-ups set]

1939

Eighteen Poles were executed in Koscian, a town of 10,000 
inhabitants south of Poznan.  One of the victims was Mieczyslaw 
Chlapowski, who was chairman of various agricultural 
organizations in Poznania and a cousin of the former Polish 
Ambassador to France.  Mr. Chlapowski knelt down with his rosary, 
said a prayer, made the sign of the cross to the crowd, and cried 
out, just before being shot to death:  "Poland has not yet perished!
Long live France.  Long live England!"  (The Black Book of Poland, pp. 33-34)

1941

The reprisal action ordered by Romanian leader Antonescu on October
22nd resulted in the seizure and murder (by shooting) of 5,000 Jewish 
civilians. At about the same time, 19,000 Jews were assembled into a 
square near the port, a square surrounded by a wooden fence. They 
were sprayed with gasoline and burned alive. In the afternoon, gendarmerie
and police rounded up over 20,000 persons, most of them Jews, and
crowded them into the local jail.(Carmelly, 80)

Bernard Lichtenberg, a Catholic priest in Berlin, is arrested after being 
denounced to the Gestapo for including non-Aryan Christians and Jews in his 
prayers, and interrogated for thirteen hours. He denied nothing but defended 
himself: He had prayed, not preached, and in his morning prayers he had included 
Hitler. He also offered to accompany the Jews who were being deported to the 
Lodz ghetto in order to minister to the Catholics among them....Indicted for 
endangering the public peace from the pulpit," he was sentenced to two years 
in prison. (Hilberg, Perpetrators, 268)

1942

Bernard Lichtenberg dies in Dachau, a year after his arrest. (Hilberg, 
Perpetrators, 268)

After (Martin) Bormann succeeded Hess as the executive head of the
Party, he was one of the prime movers in the campaign of
total spoliation, starvation, and extermination of the Jews
living under the rule of the Conspirators. A Bormann order
announced a Ministry of Foods decree, issued at his
instigation, depriving Jews of many essential food items,
and of all special sickness and pregnancy rations, and
ordering the confiscation of food parcels (3243-PS).(NCA II, 902)

1944

In response to a German request, the new Hungarian chief of
state, Szalasi, agrees to the deportation of twenty-five
thousand Hungarian Jews. The following day, SS Brigadier
General Veesenmayer reports that once these deportees have
been delivered, he will ask for more. (USHMM, 1994, p. 64)
                              
                               Work Cited

Carmelly, Dr. Felicia. Shattered! 50 Years of Silence. Scarborough: 
   Abbeyfield Publishers, 1997

Hilberg, Raul. Perpetrators, Victims, Bystanders: The Jewish Catastrophe 
   1933-1945. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.
                              
NCA II. Office of the United States Chief of Counsel for Prosecution of 
   Axis Criminality. Nazi Conspiracy and Aggression, Volume II. Washington: 
   United States Government Printing Office, 1946

Poland, Ministerstwo Informacji.  The Black Book of Poland.  New 
   York:  G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1942.
                              
USHMM (United States Holocaust Memorial Museum). Fifty
   Years Ago: Darkness Before Dawn: Days of Remembrance, April
   3-10, 1994. Washington, D.C.: 1994

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