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00010529.GIF  Page 8

LUDECKE

The big restaurant to which he led me enclosed 
what seemed like acres of Linz within its walls 
of abominably painted panels and gilded plaster....
 
"Baroque," he explained... "BAD baroque. Has it ever 
occurred to you that there is no such thing as merely 
poor baroque? The style has no middle quality; when 
it is not perfect, it's impossible. And of course, the 
very spirit of the style, its lush intimacy, makes it 
dangerous to splash baroque elements over a hail of 
such dimensions. One might as well gild a barn. But 
heavens, what a magnificent place this would be 
for a rally! Why, in this one room alone, I could 
swing all Linz!"
 
So it went, all that evening. He was in a good mood.

p. 136, Ludecke, I knew H.

Next afternoon, Hitler revealed still another side 
of his character. It was our last day together, 
and he asked me to go with him to the Poestlingberg....

When we reached the crest... we sat for a while 
in silence. Hitler gazed over the vast landscape 
with love in his eyes.... At last he spoke softly:
 
"Long ago, there was no Poestlingberg here; all 
was level. No heights, no valleys, but only unbroken 
earth, washed smooth by the primal tides as they 
flowed and ebbed over the world. Then the fires 
burst up from the earth's center; the ice marched 
down from the poles; and the earth-quakes 
convulsed like birth-pangs, shaping the face 
of the land. And after long cycles of cataclysmis 
[sic] changed, some titanic force, elemental, yet 
governed by supreme laws, thrust up this peak 
from the plane; some irresistible underground 
movement carved it out of the deepest bedrock 
and lifted it high here to dominate everything.... 
Who knows what set this force in motion? The 
crucial strain could have come from the heavy, 
overload of some distant mountain-range. Or 
perhaps the natural outlet of the fire deep in 
the earth's core was choked, until its pent-up 
energy blew this mountain sky-high like a stopper 
from a flask. Who knows? We believe these things 
are ruled by law; but the law itself partly eludes us. 
A pity, for the processes of Nature may symbolize 
mankind's little life..."
 
....I suspected him of deliberately drawing the grandiose 
parallel at which his soliloquy hinted. But I was wrong. 
It was the land itself....which filled his inner vision. He 
was just a smallish man sitting there in a neat, cheap, 
blue-serge suit, his head bare, his eyes shining - and I 
realized that he was peering backward through... Time, 
not forward into his own future....
 
p. 137, Ludecke, I knew H.

00010530.GIF  Page 9

LUDECKE

... I hear the legends of all the land marks within eyesight.
 
"How do you remember all this?"
 
The question recalled Hitler to himself.
 
"You forget that I went to school here, that I love this 
mountain and the fields below and all the things that 
grow here."

The floodgates of his memory opened... he spoke of 
his boyhood in the little town of Linz. I saw him 
through his own eyes as he searched out the significance 
of those early years. He told me of the dreams which 
had impelled him to fight his way up from poverty 
and nothingness; he spoke without sentimentality....
 
p. 138, Ludecke, I knew H.

Just as I turned away, emotionalized almost beyond 
speech, Hitler flung after me a final injunction so 
brutally practical that I almost jumped:
 
"Fetzen Sie aus Mussolini heraus, was Sie koennen!"
"Rip out of Mussolini whatever you can!"

p. 139, Ludecke, I knew H.

The truth is that an abiding conflict withint [sic] 
Hitler's own character him inadequate for the role 
he assumed. He is masterly in tactics, inept in 
executive detail.
 
p. 173, Ludecke, I knew H.

(Hanfstaengl)
He also unburdened himself about the personal problem 
Hitler was to him. For instance, he could not be 
persuaded to dine properly but still preferred the 
picnicky food that could be god anywhere. The only 
improvement Putzi had been able to make was to 
drag him to a dentist - and I acknowledge that to 
be a real triumph.
 
P. 182, Ludecke, I knew H.

(Admiral von Hintze on the Beer Hall Putsch trial)
"... Hitler too - dressed in a morning-coat, that most 
difficult of all garments to wear, let alone a badly cut 
morning-coat, and let alone a man with as bad a figure 
as Hitler, with his short legs and long torso. When I saw 
him jump on the table in that ridiculous costume, 
I thought,  'Armes Kellnerlein!'"
'Poor little waiter'....

p. 185, Ludecke, I knew H.

00010531.GIF page 10
 
LUDECKE

In court and out, Hitler has repeatedly and emphatically 
denied ever having solicited - let alone accepted - 
money from abroad. His own letter gives him the lie.

p. 190, Ludecke, I knew H.

(1924, at Landsberg)
...There stood Hitler.
 
He was wearing leather shorts and a Tyrolean jacket, 
his shirt open at the throat. His cheeks glowed with 
healthy red, and his eyes shone.... he looked better 
physically, and seemed happier, than I had ever seen 
him. Landsberg had done him a world of good.
 
He greeted me with the hearty aid of a host receiving a 
guest. Gone from his manner was the nervous intensity 
which formerly had been his most unpleasant 
characteristic. Altogether he seemed calmer and 
more certain of himself.
 
...."Yes, I couldn't be feeling better," he laughed, 
showing his old sense of humor. "This is the first 
good rest I've ever enjoyed."....

I have spoken before of his genius for dismissing 
topics which he does not wish to discuss. Time 
after time during this talk he availed himself of 
it, ending further conversation as effectively as 
though he had suddenly darkened a room where 
deaf-mutes were talking with their fingers. I 
noticed that he barred, in particular, any reminder 
of the putsch, and any question concerning his 
policy toward the Party schism.

....Also, Hitler was plainly embarrassed, as I was, 
by the memory of our intimate meeting on the 
Poestlingberg, when we had mutually vowed so 
many things which never came to pass....
 
233/234. Ludecke, I knew H.

...when Hitler and I discussed the situation at 
Landsberg ...I was (not) daring enough to voice 
the serious apprehensions half-awakened by 
the obvious change in Hitler himself. I couldn't 
help feeling something of mendacity in him; ... 
He was still true to his old character in ... one 
trait, the most unfortunate of all... Hitler was 
determined to dominate....
 
p. 239, Ludecke, I knew H.

00010532.GIF  Page 11

LUDECKE
 
Hitler habitually rationalizes his choices... being 
faced with a distasteful choice... he arrived at the 
lofty conclusion that there was no choice - that 
being the one mad entrusted by destiny with the 
salvation of Germany, he had no moral right to 
shift his responsibility to deputy saviors. But 
whatever the motive, the practical effect of his 
vacillation was obvious. Instead of bringing order 
out of confusion, he deliberately increased it....
 
p. 241/242. Ludecke, I knew H.

Two Hitlers...
 
,,,it was the best in the Fuehrer which withered 
after the trial, while the less worthy traits flourished.

...Hitler assayed lighter than fine metal should.
 
p. 248, Ludecke, I knew H.

But the great General (Ludendorff) had served his 
purpose. Hitler simply scrapped him, offering him 
needless affronts...
 
Ever since doubt of Hitler's flawless greatness had 
begun to creep into my mind....
 
pp. 272/73. Ludecke, I knew H.

(1925, Munich)
Then Hitler came in... clasped my hand, tapped my 
shoulder, and asked me to tell him more about 
Henry Ford, and Budapest...
 
...During this glum recital, Hitler had been interrupting 
me frequently, appearing irritated and nervous. The 
healthy air he had in Landsberg was gone, and with it 
his poise. He looked almost fat; his cheeks seemed 
flabby and his chin weak, and as usual plenty of 
dandruff adorned collar and shoulders of his dark 
blue suit. Now and then there was something foxy 
and false about him, and his voice seemed not to 
ring true. For the first time I felt a distinct dislike 
for him.....
p. 273, Ludecke, I knew H.


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