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Last-Modified: 1997/10/19

Page IX

                ANALYTICAL LIST OF DOCUMENTS

  I. TENTATIVE EFFORTS TO IMPROVE GERMAN-SOVIET RELATIONS,
                  APRIL 17-AUGUST 14, 1939
Date      Subject                                           Pag
                                                            e
1939                                                           
Apr. 17   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German     1
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Conversation  with  the  Soviet  Ambassador
          who,  after  discussing  Soviet  contracts  with
          Skoda,  suggests  the  possibility  of  improved
          Soviet-German relations.
May 4     The German Charge in the Soviet Union               2
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               The  significance  of  the  replacement  of
          Litvinov by Molotov.
May 5     Foreign Office Memorandum                           3
               The  Soviet  Charge, Astakhov, suggests  to
          Schnurre  the  revival of economic  negotiations
          and   stresses  the  significance  of  Molotov's
          appointment.
May 9     Foreign Office Memorandum                           3
               Astakhov expresses pleasure at the  changed
          tone of the German press.
May 17    Foreign Office Memorandum                           4
               Astakhov   is   skeptical  concerning   the
          prospects of an Anglo-Soviet agreement,  and  is
          optimistic  on  the improvement of Soviet-German
          relations.
May 20    Memorandum by the German Ambassador in the          5
               Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Molotov says the construction of "political
          bases"  must  precede new economic negotiations;
          he refuses to elaborate.
May 21    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office    7
               (Weizsacker)to the German Ambassador in the
               Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Schulenburg to take no action.
May 22    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union           8
               (Schulenburg) to the State Secretary in the
               German Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               An   analysis  of  political  currents   in
          Moscow.
May 27    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office    9
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Germany  hesitates to make  advances  until
          the  outcome  of  the Soviet  negotiations  with
          Britain and France is known.
May 29    Foreign Office Memorandum                          11
               Arguments for and against negotiations with
          the U.S.S.R.
          
          Foreign Office Memorandum
               A  proposal  that  Weizsacker  explore  the
          possibility of agreement.

Page X

  I. TENTATIVE EFFORTS TO IMPROVE GERMAN SOVIET RELATIONS,
             APRIL 17-AUGUST 14, 1939-Continued
Date      Subject                                           Pag
                                                            e
1939                                                        
May 30    Memorandum  by the State Secretary in the German   12
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Both Weizsacker and Astakhov, in
          conversation on economic questions, hint that a
          German-Soviet political agreement is desirable
          and possible.
May 30    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office   15
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               A   telegraphic  summary   of   the   above
          conversation; Germany has decided  to  undertake
          negotiations.
May 30    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office   17
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg).
               Hilger  may  begin  economic  negotiations;
          political  questions  are  to  be  referred   to
          Berlin.
June 5    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          18
               (Schulenburg) to the State Secretary in the
               German Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Contends that, in the interview of May  20,
          Molotov   had   not  rejected  a   German-Soviet
          political  agreement;  rather,  he  had   almost
          invited political discussions.
June 15   Foreign Office Memorandum                          20
               The    Bulgarian   Minister    reports    a
          conversation  with  Astakhov on  Soviet  foreign
          policy.
June 18   The German Charge in the Soviet Union              21
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               The  Soviet  Government  is  skeptical   of
          German   sincerity.  Enclosure:  Mikoyan   tells
          Hilger   that  the  German  reply  on   economic
          negotiations is "not entirely favorable."
June 27   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          24
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stresses  the Soviet fear that  Germany  is
          pushing  economic negotiations only to block  an
          Anglo-Soviet  agreement and  that  Germany  will
          allow  the  negotiations  to  lapse  when   this
          objective is achieved.
June 29   Foreign Office Memorandum                          25
               Hitler   orders   negotiations   with   the
          U.S.S.R. ended.
June 29   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          26
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               A  conversation  with Molotov,  who,  while
          still   suspicious,  shows  desire  to  maintain
          contact with Germany.
June 30   The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office   27
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               No  further action is to be taken  for  the
          moment on political or economic negotiation.

Page XI

  I. TENTATIVE EFFORTS TO IMPROVE GERMAN SOVIET RELATIONS,
             APRIL 17-AUGUST 14, 1939-Continued
Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
July 3    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          28
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Details of the conversation of June 28 with
          Molotov.
July 12   The Counselor of Embassy of the German Embassy     28
               in the Soviet Union (Tippelskirch) to the
               German Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               After conversations in Berlin, he concludes
          that  there is no definite political opinion  on
          the problem of negotiations with the U.S.S.R.
July 22   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          30
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               The  Soviet press announces the opening  of
          economic negotiations.
July 27   Foreign Office Memorandum                          32
               Schnurre, in conversation with Astakhov and
          Babarin,   explores  problems  of  German-Soviet
          relations.
July 29   The German Foreign Office to the German            36
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Schulenburg is to discover Molotov's  views
          on  the  above  conversation,  and,  if  Molotov
          abandons  his reserve, to state that Germany  is
          prepared  to respect Soviet interests in  Poland
          and the Baltic States.
Aug. 3    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office   37
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Schnurre will tell Astakhov that Germany is
          ready for more concrete discussions.
Aug. 3    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German           37
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Germany  must  know  whether  or  not   the
          U.S.S.R. is prepared to settle all problems,  so
          that  German policy can be adjusted to meet  the
          Soviet position.
Aug. 4    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          39
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov, abandoning reserve, expresses hope
          for improved relations, but says that proofs  of
          a changed German attitude are lacking.
Aug. 7    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          42
               (Schulenburg) to Counselor of Legation
               Schliep of the German Foreign Office
               Schulenburg comments privately  on  British
          and  French  negotiations with the U.S.S.R.,  on
          Soviet  mistrust  of  Germany,  and  on  current
          gossip in Moscow.
Aug. 10   Foreign Office Memorandum                          44
               Schnurre   warns   Astakhov   that   Soviet
          interests in Poland can be protected only  by  a
          German-Soviet  agreement  concluded  before  the
          outbreak  of war; Astakhov says the negotiations
          with  Britain were begun by the Soviets  without
          enthusiasm,  and  only  as  protection   against
          Germany.

Page XII

  I. TENTATIVE EFFORTS TO IMPROVE GERMAN SOVIET RELATIONS,
             APRIL 17-AUGUST 14, 1939-Continued
Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Aug. 14   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         46
               (Schulenburg) to the State Secretary in the
               German Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Reviews  the situation in Moscow to justify
          his belief that haste should be avoided.
Aug. 14   The German Foreign Office to the German           48
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               In  accordance with instructions,  Astakhov
          tells Schnurre that the Soviet Government wishes
          to discuss each group of questions, by stages.
                              
      II. AGREEMENT ACHIEVED, AUGUST 14-AUGUST 23, 1939

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Aug. 14   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          50
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Schulenburg    to   tell    Molotov    that
          ideological differences do not exclude  friendly
          cooperation; that all questions from the  Baltic
          to  the Balkans can be settled; that the western
          democracies  are  the natural  enemies  of  both
          Germany  and the U.S.S.R.; that, since  war  may
          come  soon, immediate clarification of relations
          is  desirable;  that Ribbentrop is  prepared  to
          come to Moscow to negotiate.
Aug. 16   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         52
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               On  August  15,  Molotov  says  he  is  now
          convinced  of  German  sincerity,  but  believes
          adequate preparation should precede Ribbentrop's
          visit; he inquires about German views on a  non-
          aggression pact and on territorial questions.
Aug. 16   Memorandum by the German Ambassador in the        53
               Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               A    detailed   account   of   the    above
          conversation.
Aug. 16   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         57
               (Schulenburg) to the State Secretary in the
               German Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Schulenburg  stresses the  candor  and  the
          willingness  to negotiate shown  by  Molotov  on
          August 15.
Aug. 16   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          58
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to tell Molotov that  Germany
          is  ready to conclude a non-aggression pact,  to
          guarantee jointly the Baltic States, and to work
          for  improved  relations between Japan  and  the
          U.S.S.R.  The need for haste is to be  stressed,
          Ribbentrop  is  ready to come to Moscow  at  any
          time  after  August  18 with  full  powers  from
          Hitler.
Aug. 18   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         59
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Schulenburg  reads  Ribbentrop's  offer  of
          August 16; Molotov reads the Soviet reply to the
          German  proposals  of August 15,  stressing  the
          earlier  Soviet  fear of German aggression,  the
          willingness  of  the  U.S.S.R.  to  conclude   a
          political agreement after the economic agreement
          had  been  signed,  and the  need  for  thorough
          preparation   before  the  proposed   visit   of
          Ribbentrop.

Page XIII

 II. AGREEMENT ACHIEVED, AUGUST 14-AUGUST 23, 1939-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Aug. 18   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          61
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to  tell Molotov  immediately
          that  speed  is essential since hostilities  may
          begin any day; to read him the text for the non-
          aggression  treaty proposed by Germany,  and  to
          state that Ribbentrop will be empowered to  sign
          a protocol defining spheres of influence.
Aug. 19   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         63
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  agrees to visit of  Ribbentrop  on
          August 26 or 27 and submits the draft for a non-
          aggression pact.
Aug. 19   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         64
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               In  the  first  of  two interviews  Molotov
          insists on the need for thorough preparation for
          Ribbentrop's   visit,   within   a   half   hour
          Schulenburg  is  requested to  call  on  Molotov
          again, in the second interview Molotov gives the
          draft  of a non-aggression pact and consents  to
          visit   of  Ribbentrop  on  August  26  or   27,
          Schulenburg assumes that the changed attitude of
          Molotov is explained by Stalin's intervention.
Aug. 19   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         65
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Gives the terms of the non-aggression  pact
          proposed by the Soviet Government.
Aug. 20   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          66
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Encloses  a  letter from Hitler  to  Stalin
          accepting the Soviet draft non-aggression  pact,
          expressing  the  belief that  agreement  on  the
          supplementary  protocol can be speedily  reached
          only  if a responsible German official comes  to
          Moscow,  urging that the imminence of war  makes
          speed  essential,  and  requesting  that  Stalin
          receive Ribbentrop not later than August 23.
Aug. 21   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          67
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Stresses importance of his visit.
Aug. 21   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         67
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Hitler's  message delivered to Molotov  and
          necessity for haste emphasized.
Aug. 21   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         68
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stalin's answer is conciliatory; he  agrees
          to the arrival of Ribbentrop on August 23.
Aug. 21   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         69
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               The text of Stalin's reply to Hitler.
Aug. 22   Full Powers to the Reich Foreign Minister, Herr   69
               Joachim von Ribbentrop
               Full powers from Hitler to Ribbentrop.

Page XIV

 II. AGREEMENT ACHIEVED, AUGUST 14-AUGUST 23, 1939-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Aug. 22   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   70
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The     Japanese    Ambassador    expresses
          uneasiness concerning the probable repercussions
          of  a  German-Soviet pact in  Japan;  Weizsacker
          maintains  that the pact was made  necessary  by
          the   refusal  of  Japan  to  conclude  a   firm
          alliance.
Aug. 23   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German Foreign  71
               Office
               Requests Hitler's consent to placing  Libau
          and Windau in Soviet sphere of influence.
Aug. 23   The German Foreign Office to the Reich Foreign    72
               Minister
               Hitler agrees to above.
Aug. 24   Memorandum of a Conversation Held on the Night    72
               of August 23d to 24th, Between the Reich
               Foreign Minister on the One Hand, and Herr
               Stalin and the Chairman of the Council of
               People's Commissars Molotov, on the Other
               Hand
               Discussion of Soviet relations with  Japan,
          the  aspirations  of Italy in the  Balkans,  the
          strength and weakness of Britain and France, the
          Anti-Comintern  Pact, and the  natural  sympathy
          between the German people and the peoples of the
          U.S.S.R.;  toasts  at  the  conclusion  of   the
          discussion.
Aug. 23   Treaty of Non-aggression Between Germany and the  76
               Union of Soviet Socialist Republics
               Each  government  pledges  itself  not   to
          attack,  not to support attack against, and  not
          to join any grouping of powers directed against,
          the  other  contracting party; each promises  to
          consult  the  other on all questions  of  common
          interest.
Aug. 23   Secret Additional Protocol                        78
               The  Northern boundary of Lithuania  to  be
          the  boundary  between  the  German  and  Soviet
          spheres of influence, this boundary in Poland to
          be  the line of the rivers Narew, Vistula,  San,
          whether  there  is  to be an independent  Poland
          will  be determined later by friendly agreement;
          in  Southeastern  Europe, Germany  declares  her
          political  disinterestedness  in  those   areas,
          while the interest of the U.S.S.R. in Bessarabia
          is affirmed.

 III. THE PACT EXECUTED AND AMENDED, AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 28,
                            1939

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Aug. 23   The Reich Finance Minister (Schwerin-Krosigk) to   79
               the Reich Foreign Minister
               Ciano  says  that despite the German-Soviet
          pact, Britain and France will fight and that the
          Axis  is  not prepared for the war of  attrition
          which  would ensue; Schwerin-Krosigk says Hitler
          did  not  believe  there would  be  a  war  with
          Britain  and France, Ciano replies  that  he  is
          aware of that, but he believes Hitler is wrong.

Page XV

 III. THE PACT EXECUTED AND AMENDED, AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 28,
                       1939-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Aug. 25   Letter from Hitler to Mussolini                   80
               Hitler maintains that the refusal of  Japan
          to   conclude   a  general  alliance   and   the
          unbearable  provocations of Poland  necessitated
          the  pact with the U.S.S.R.; now, in case of war
          the  favorable  attitude  of  the  U.S.S.R.   is
          assured,  Rumania cannot intervene,  and  Turkey
          must revise her position; war may come any hour.
Aug. 25   Letter from Mussolini to Hitler                   82
               Mussolini approves the German-Soviet  pact;
          he  understands  the  German position  regarding
          Poland,  if Germany attacks, and the  allies  of
          Poland  counterattack, Italy can intervene  only
          if Germany supplies arms and raw materials.
Aug. 29   Foreign Office Memorandum                         83
               By  the  German-Soviet Trade  Agreement  of
          August 19, Germany will export machines, machine
          tools,  and munitions to the U.S.S.R., receiving
          raw  materials in exchange, particularly lumber,
          cotton,   feed   grain,  oil  cake,   phosphate,
          platinum, raw furs, and petroleum.
Sept. 2   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         85
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               After  consultation  with  Stalin,  Molotov
          says Soviet relations with Turkey are good,  and
          that  the Soviet Government is prepared to  work
          for  permanent  Turkish  neutrality  as  Germany
          desires.
Sept. 3   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          86
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Expects decisive defeat of Polish Army in a
          few  weeks,  instructions to suggest to  Molotov
          the  advisability  at proper  time  of  military
          occupation of Soviet sphere of influence.
Sept. 5   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         87
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov deprecates premature occupation  of
          Soviet sphere.
Sept. 5   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         87
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov says the Soviet Government is using
          its  considerable influence with Turkey  in  the
          sense desired by Germany.
Sept. 6   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         88
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               The  sudden  shift of Soviet policy  toward
          Germany  is reflected in the completely  changed
          tone of organs of public opinion; the population
          is  still bewildered by the shift and fearful of
          war,  but  the  Soviet  Government  has  a  ways
          previously   been   able   to   direct   popular
          attitudes.
Sept. 9   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         89
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  extends  congratulations  on   the
          entry of German troops into Warsaw.

Page XVI

 III. THE PACT EXECUTED AND AMENDED, AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 28,
                       1939-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Sept. 9   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German           89
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to suggest again  to  Molotov
          the  need  for  information on  Soviet  military
          intentions in Poland.
Sept. 9   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          90
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  says  that Soviet military  action
          will take place in the next few days.
Sept. 9   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          90
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Describes Soviet military preparations.
Sept. 10  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          91
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov says the Soviet Government was  not
          prepared for the swift German victory,  the  Red
          Army  is  not vet ready to advance;  the  Soviet
          Government,   to   avoid   the   appearance   of
          aggression, would justify its military action by
          saying  that Ukrainians and White Russians  were
          threatened by Germany.
Sept. 13  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German           92
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Denies   rumors  of  an  armistice  between
          Germany and Poland.
Sept. 14  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          92
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  wishes  to know when  Warsaw  will
          fall so that he may say Poland has collapsed and
          Russian minorities require protection.
Sept. 15  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German           93
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Warsaw is expected to fall in the next  few
          days;  suggests  the text for  a  joint  German-
          Soviet communiqu‚, states that the justification
          for  Soviet military action suggested by Molotov
          would  expose  the two states as enemies  before
          the whole world.
Sept. 16  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          95
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  says  Soviet  military  action  is
          imminent,  he  sees  no  reason  for   a   joint
          communiqu‚; he requests that Germany accept  the
          proposed justification of Soviet action in  view
          of   the   difficult  position  of  the   Soviet
          Government.
Sept. 17  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          96
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stalin  says  the Red Army will  cross  the
          frontier  today, he alters the text of the  note
          to be handed the Polish Ambassador so that it is
          satisfactory to Germany.
Sept. 17  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union          97
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
          Stalin says that an assistance pact with Turkey
          is being negotiated; he believes the pact
          advantageous since it would insure Turkish
          neutrality.

Page XVII

 III. THE PACT EXECUTED AND AMENDED, AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 28,
                       1939-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Sept. 18  Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   97
               Foreign Office ( Weizsacker)
               Ribbentrop  should  discuss  the   proposed
          Turkish-Soviet agreement with the  Italians;  we
          should  concur  only  if  the  U.S.S.R.  is  not
          obligated to action against Germany, Italy,  and
          Bulgaria.
Sept. 18  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         98
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stalin  doubts if German High Command  will
          withdraw  to  agreed line; Schulenburg  requests
          authority to remove his doubts.
Sept. 18  Memorandum by Counselor of Legation Hilger of     98
               the German Embassy in the Soviet Union
               Describes  revision by Stalin of communiqu‚
          proposed  by  Germany,  Stalin  considered   the
          German  version  too  frank;  German  draft  and
          Stalin's draft are appended.
Sept. 19  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          101
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to  tell Stalin  that  German
          agreements with the U.S.S.R. will be kept,  they
          are the foundation of friendly relations between
          Germany and the U.S.S.R.
Sept. 20  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         101
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov proposes negotiations in Moscow for
          a definitive Polish settlement.
Sept. 23  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          102
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Willingness to come to Moscow to  effect  a
          definitive Polish settlement.
Sept. 25  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         102
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stalin proposes that Germany waive claim to
          Lithuania in return for a larger part of  Polish
          territory,  Stalin requests assent to  immediate
          solution of the problem of the Baltic countries.
Sept. 27  The German Foreign Office to the German Embassy   103
               in the Soviet Union
               The  U.S.S.R. has demanded an alliance with
          Estonia, and naval and air bases.
Sept. 27  The German Foreign Office to the German Embassy   104
               in the Soviet Union
               The  Finnish  Foreign Minister states  that
          Finland  will never accept demands such  as  the
          U.S.S.R. has imposed on Estonia.
Sept. 27  The German Foreign Office to the German Embassy   104
               in the Soviet Union
               The  Estonian Government will negotiate  in
          Moscow;  they  will seek a reduction  of  Soviet
          demands.

Page XVIII

 III. THE PACT EXECUTED AND AMENDED, AUGUST 23-SEPTEMBER 28,
                       1939-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Sept. 27- Timetable of Ribbentrop's Second Visit to Moscow  105
29
Sept. 28  German-Soviet Boundary and Friendship Treaty      105
               The  text  of  the  public treaty  defining
          boundaries   in   the   territory   of   Poland;
          interference by third powers will be rejected.
Sept. 28  Confidential Protocol                             106
               Providing   for   exchange   of   nationals
          residing   within  the  territories  under   the
          jurisdiction of the two powers.
Sept. 28  Secret Supplementary Protocol                     107
               Lithuania,  except  for  territory  in  the
          southwest,  is  within  the  Russian  sphere  of
          influence; the province of Lublin and  parts  of
          the province of Warsaw are in the German sphere;
          economic   agreements  between   Lithuania   and
          Germany will not be affected by Soviet action.
Sept. 28  Secret Supplementary Protocol                     107
               Both Germany and the U.S.S.R. will suppress
          any Polish agitation.
Sept. 28  Declaration of the Government of the German       108
               Reich and the Government of the U.S.S.R. of
               September 28, 1939
               Affirming that peace should be restored  in
          Europe   now   that   the  Polish   problem   is
          definitively settled.
Sept. 28  The Reich Foreign Minister to the Chairman of     108
               the Council of People's Commissars of the
               Soviet Union (Molotov)
               An  agreement to begin negotiations  for  a
          new trade treaty.
Sept. 28  The Reich Foreign Minister to the Chairman o~     109
               the Council of People's Commissars of the
               Soviet Union (Molotov)
               Confirming  a Soviet promise to  facilitate
          German  transit  traffic through  the  U.S.S.R.,
          with  Rumania, Iran, Afghanistan,  and  the  Far
          East, confirming also a Soviet agreement on  the
          delivery of oil.

 IV. GERMAN-SOVIET COOPERATION, OCTOBER 2, 1939-MAY 29, 1940

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Oct. 2    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          110
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to  suggest  once   more   to
          Molotov  the desirability of Soviet pressure  to
          prevent the alliance of Turkey with  Britain and
          France.
Oct. 2    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          110
               Ambassador in Turkey (Papen)
               Instructions to use every effort to prevent
          the alliance of Turkey with Britain and France.

Page XIX

IV. GERMAN-SOVIET COOPERATION, OCTOBER 2, 1939-MAY 29, 1940-
                          Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Oct. 2    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   111
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The Finnish Minister asks what significance
          the  German-Soviet agreements have for  Finland.
          Weizsacker replies that Germany wishes  friendly
          relations with Finland.
Oct. 3    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         112
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov   says  he  intends  to  tell   the
          Lithuanian Foreign Minister that the U.S.S.R. is
          willing to give Vilna to Lithuania and also that
          Lithuania  must cede a portion of its  territory
          to  Germany.  Schulenburg fears this  will  make
          Germany  appear  a "robber" while  the  U.S.S.R.
          appears a donor.
Oct. 3    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         113
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  says  the U.S.S.R.  is  using  its
          influence with Turkey in the desired direction.
Oct. 4    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          113
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to  request  Molotov  not  to
          speak of the strip of Lithuanian territory.
Oct. 5    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         114
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  says that he had already told  the
          Lithuanians of the territory which  must  go  to
          Germany,  that the Lithuanians had been dismayed
          by  the  news, and that Stalin requests  Germany
          not to insist on cession at this time.
Oct. 5    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          115
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               The  German  Minister to  Lithuania  is  to
          state  that,  in  the  negotiations  at  Moscow,
          Germany  recommended  the cession  of  Vilna  to
          Lithuania,  and reserved the right  to  a  small
          strip of Lithuanian territory, he is to say that
          the  Reich Government does not wish to raise the
          latter question at this time.
Oct. 5    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   116
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The     Lithuanian    Minister    expresses
          satisfaction  with  the German  explanation,  as
          given above.
Oct. 7    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          117
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to emphasize to Molotov  that
          if  the  U.S.S.R.  concludes an assistance  pact
          with  Turkey, any obligation to give  assistance
          against  Germany must be expressly and  publicly
          excluded; otherwise the confidence of the German
          people  in the German-Soviet agreements will  be
          shaken.
Oct. 8    The Chairman of the Council of People's           118
               Commissars of the Soviet Union (Molotov) to
               the German Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               If   Soviet   troops   are   stationed   in
          Lithuania,  they  will  not  occupy  the   strip
          reserved  for  Germany; Germany  will  determine
          when the agreement concerning this territory  is
          to be implemented.

Page XX

IV. GERMAN-SOVIET COOPERATION, OCTOBER 2, 1939-MAY 29, 1940-
                          Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Oct. ?    Foreign Office Memorandum                         119
               Schnurre is to seek increased deliveries of
          raw materials by and through the U.S.S.R.
Oct. 9    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         120
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov does not believe an assistance pact
          will  be concluded with Turkey, the aim  of  the
          Soviet   Government  is  to  secure   the   full
          neutrality of Turkey.
Oct. 9    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   121
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The   Finnish  Government  wishes  to  know
          whether  Germany is indifferent  to  the  Soviet
          advance in the Baltic.
Oct. 9    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  122
               (Weizsacker) to the German Minister in
               Finland (Blcher)
               Germany  is not in a position to  intervene
          in the Soviet-Finnish conversations.
Oct. 9    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   123
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The  Swedish Minister expresses  uneasiness
          concerning  possible Soviet demands on  Finland;
          Weizsacker  replies  that  Germany   claims   no
          interests there.
Oct. 10   The German Minister in Finland (Blcher) to the   123
               German Foreign Office
               Because  of her economic interests, Germany
          should ask the U. S. S. R. to lessen her demands
          on Finland.
Oct. 12   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   124
               Foreign Office ( Weizsacker)
               The    Bulgarian   Minister   states   that
          Molotov's  offer to conclude a mutual assistance
          pact has been rejected.
Oct. 18   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          124
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               In a speech soon to be delivered on foreign
          affairs, Ribbentrop wishes to refute the British
          claim  that in Moscow he had asked for, and  had
          been  refused,  Soviet military  assistance  the
          text of this portion of the speech is given;  it
          includes  a  direct quotation of Stalin  on  the
          Soviet  need for a strong Germany,  and  on  the
          parallel  interests of Germany and the  U.S.S.R.
          in  case  of war between Germany and the Western
          democracies.
Oct. 19   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         126
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stalin   approves  the   account   of   the
          negotiations   in   Moscow;   he   requests    a
          modification of the direct quotation so that the
          community   of   Soviet-German   interests    is
          exclusively  related to the need  for  a  strong
          Germany.
Nov. 1    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   127
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Goring, Raeder, and Keitel complain of  the
          war  materials demands of the Russian delegation
          in Berlin.

Page XXI

IV. GERMAN-SOVIET COOPERATION, OCTOBER 2, 1939-MAY 29, 1940-
                          Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1939                                                           
Dec. 2    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  127
               (Weizsacker) to German Missions Abroad
               In  conversations  regarding  the  Finnish-
          Russian  conflict  avoid any  anti-Soviet  note;
          rather, justify the Soviet action.
Dec. 5    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   128
               Foreign Office ( Weizsacker)
               Keitel  complains  of  friction  along  the
          Soviet frontier, particularly in connection with
          the expulsion of Jews into Soviet territory.
Dec. 5    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   128
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Keitel  again complains that Soviet demands
          for   the   delivery  of  German  products   are
          increasingly  voluminous and  unreasonable;  the
          Foreign  Office  intends  to  curb  the   Soviet
          demands.
Dec. 6    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  129
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               German  missions  abroad  have  again  been
          instructed to support the Soviet point  of  view
          in the Finnish conflict.
Dec. 11   Memorandum by the Reich Foreign Minister          130
               In    conversations   with    the    Soviet
          Ambassador,  he  protests and refutes  the  Tass
          report  of  German  delivery  of  munitions   to
          Finland;  he also intimates that Soviet  demands
          for military supplies are excessive.
1940                                                        
Feb. 26   Foreign Office Memorandum-Memorandum on the       
               German-Soviet Commercial Agreement Signed    131
               on February 11, 1940
               Schnurre summarizes the promised deliveries
          of  Soviet  raw  materials  and  emphasizes  the
          sacrifices these deliveries will entail for  the
          U.S.S.R.;  he tells of difficulties  which  were
          surmounted  in the negotiation of the agreement,
          and  of  those which may arise in its execution,
          he concludes that the Soviet deliveries, and the
          transit  facilities through the  U.S.S.R.,  will
          decisively  weaken the effects  of  the  British
          blockade.
Mar. 28   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          134
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Ribbentrop  suggests that Molotov  and,  if
          possible, Stalin visit Berlin.
Mar. 30   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         135
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Schulenburg  does  not believe  Molotov  or
          Stalin will visit Berlin; they are determined to
          preserve Soviet neutrality and a visit to Berlin
          might   precipitate  a  breach   of   diplomatic
          relations or even war with the Western powers.
Apr. 3    The German Foreign Office to the German           137
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               The  idea  of a visit to Berlin is  dropped
          for the present.
Apr. 7    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          137
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Notification of, and justification for, the
          German  invasion of Norway and  Denmark,  to  be
          presented to Molotov on April 9.

Page XXII

IV. GERMAN-SOVIET COOPERATION, OCTOBER 2, 1939-MAY 29, 1940-
                          Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Apr. 9    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         138
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  notified of invasion; he  declares
          that  the  Soviet  Government  understands   the
          German   action,  and  wishes  Germany  complete
          success in her defensive measures.
Apr. 11   Memorandum by the German Ambassador in the        138
               Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               For  some  time the attitude of the  Soviet
          Government    towards   Germany    had    become
          increasingly aloof; with the invasion of Norway,
          that  attitude  suddenly became  most  friendly,
          Schulenburg believes that the Soviet  Government
          had feared war with the Western powers, and that
          the  German  invasion of Norway  relieved  these
          fears.
Apr. 13   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         140
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov urges that the continued neutrality
          of  Sweden  is in the interests both of  Germany
          and of the U.S.S.R.
Apr. 15   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          141
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Germany  is  determined to respect  Swedish
          neutrality.
May 7     The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          141
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               On May 10, Molotov is to be notified of the
          invasion   of  the  Netherlands,  Belgium,   and
          Luxembourg.
May 10    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         142
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               On  notification  of the invasion,  Molotov
          says he understands the German action and has no
          doubt of its success.
May 29    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         142
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               The  report that the Soviet Government  has
          agreed to the sending of Cripps is credible, but
          there  is no reason to doubt the loyalty of  the
          U.S.S.R. toward Germany.

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                            1940

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
June 4    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         144
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov   wishes  to  know  if  Mackensen's
          statement that Balkan problems are to be  solved
          by  cooperation among Germany, the U.S.S.R., and
          Italy  reflects  the opinion of the  German  and
          Italian Governments.
June 6    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         144
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               It  is clear that Molotov hopes Mackensen's
          statement represents the official view.

Page XXIII

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                       1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
June 8    The German Foreign Office to the Representative   145
               of the German Foreign Office With the Reich
               Protector of Bohemia and Moravia
               No  political activities are to be  carried
          on   by   Ukrainian  organizations  in   Greater
          Germany.
June 11   Foreign Office Memorandum                         146
               The   Lithuanian  Minister  tells  of   the
          increasing Soviet pressure on Lithuania.
June 14   The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  147
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to  discuss  tactfully   with
          Molotov   the   hostile  attitude  of   Minister
          Kollontay toward Germany.
June 16   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          148
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Mackensen  says that he only expressed  the
          hope  that  the Balkans would remain quiet;  the
          German  attitude was established in  the  Moscow
          agreement.
June 16   The German Foreign Office to the Reich Foreign    148
               Minister
               Tells  of  Lithuanians  seeking  refuge  in
          Germany; requests instructions.
June 16    Foreign Office Memorandum                        149
               High    Command    requests    instructions
          regarding  Lithuanian troops which may  seek  to
          cross the frontier.
June 16   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German Foreign  150
               Office
               Border crossings by Lithuanians are  to  be
          permitted but not encouraged; troops are  to  be
          disarmed and interned.
June 16   Foreign Office Memorandum                         151
               Hitler  has ordered disarming of Lithuanian
          troops who cross border; German troops returning
          to  garrisons  in  East  Prussia  are  to  avoid
          notice.
June 16   The Reich Foreign Minister's Personal Staff to    151
               the German Foreign Office
               Ribbentrop wishes to know at once if Baltic
          States  are  tending to seek German support,  or
          are forming a bloc.
June 17   The German Foreign Office to the Reich Foreign    152
               Minister
               Reviews  cooperation between Baltic States,
          and  concludes  there  is little;  there  is  no
          political   dependence  on  Germany  but   close
          economic relations exist, an attached memorandum
          by  Schnurre details the economic importance  of
          the Baltic States for Germany.
June 17   The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  153
               (Weizsacker) to All German Missions
               Events  in  the Baltic States concern  only
          those   states  and  the  U.S.S.R.;  avoid   any
          partisan statement.

Page XXIV

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                       1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
June 18   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         154
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               After expressing warmest congratulations on
          the  German  military  successes,  Molotov  said
          Soviet action in the Baltic States was necessary
          to  end  British and French intrigue; Dekanosov,
          Vishinsky,   and  Zhdanov  had  been   sent   to
          negotiate the formation of new governments.
June 23   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         155
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  says  that  a  solution   of   the
          Bessarabian  question can no longer be  delayed,
          and that the Soviet claim extends to Bucovina.
June 24   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         156
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Sends  a  Tass report denying that  German-
          Soviet relations have deteriorated.
June 24   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         157
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Believes  Stalin is the author of the  Tass
          report,  and that the report is preparation  for
          the solution of the Bessarabian problem.
June 24   Memorandum by the Reich Foreign Minister for      157
               Hitler
               Gives  the  text of the Secret Protocol  of
          August  23, 1939, at the time, he stated  orally
          German   disinterestedness  in  Bessarabia:   he
          recalls  that  Hitler  had  authorized  him,  if
          necessary to declare German disinterestedness as
          far as the Straits.
June 25   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          158
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to tell Molotov that  Germany
          has no interest in Bessarabia, that Bucovina  is
          a  new  question in which Germany is  interested
          because of the dense German population; that the
          economic needs of Germany require peace  in  the
          Balkans,  and  that Germany is ready  to  advise
          Rumania to reach a peaceful settlement.
June 26   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         159
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Tells   Molotov   of  Ribbentrop's   views,
          Schulenburg has the impression that the claim to
          Bucovina may be dropped.
June 26   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         160
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               In    conversation   with    the    Italian
          Ambassador,   Molotov   outlines   a    possible
          agreement  on the Balkans, and says  the  Soviet
          Government  will recognize Italian  hegemony  in
          the  Mediterranean  if Italy  recognizes  Soviet
          hegemony in the Black Sea.
June 26   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         161
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov states that the Soviet demand  will
          be  limited to northern Bucovina, and adds  that
          he expects German support for this demand.

Page XXV

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                       1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
June 27   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         163
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov states that he has presented to the
          Rumanian   Minister   the  Soviet   demand   for
          Bessarabia and northern Bucovina.
June 27   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German Foreign  163
               Office
               Ribbentrop says Rumania is to be advised to
          yield; this advice is telephoned to Bucharest.
July 11   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         164
               (Schulenburg) to the State Secretary in the
               German Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Diplomats  in Moscow attribute  the  recent
          diplomatic  activity  of  the  U.S.S.R.   to   a
          conviction  that the war will soon end;  further
          moves are expected in the Baltic states, Turkey,
          and Iran.
July 13   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         166
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov states that Stalin acknowledges the
          obligation  to  cede  the  strip  of  Lithuanian
          territory, but hopes Germany will not insist  on
          the cession.
July 13   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         166
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               On  instructions from Stalin, Molotov gives
          Schulenburg    a   memorandum   summarizing    a
          conversation between Stalin and Cripps, in which
          Stalin  rebuffed  all efforts  to  separate  the
          U.S.S.R. from Germany.
July 22   Foreign Office Memorandum                         168
               The  Lithuanian Minister hands  Woermann  a
          strong   letter   of  protest   against   Soviet
          activities in Lithuania, which are described  in
          detail;  Woermann consents to ask if  Ribbentrop
          will receive the letter.
July 22   Foreign Office Memorandum                         171
               The  Latvian  Minister presents  a  similar
          letter of protest.
July 24   Foreign Office Memorandum                         172
               Woermann  returns  the above  letters,  and
          refuses  to  accept a similar  letter  from  the
          Estonian Minister.
July 29   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         173
               (Schulenburg) to  the German Foreign Office
               Molotov requests information on the  recent
          discussions  of  Germany and Italy  with  Balkan
          statesmen;  Schulenburg  replies  that  he  will
          request information.
July 30   The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  173
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Instructions    to   tell    Molotov    the
          conversations resulted from German  advice  that
          Rumania   negotiate  directly   concerning   the
          demands  of Hungary and Bulgaria for territorial
          revision.

Page XXVI

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                       1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Aug. 2    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          174
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions to inform Molotov that Germany
          wishes  to  know what is offered as compensation
          before considering the Soviet request concerning
          the strip of Lithuanian territory.
Aug. 6    Memorandum by the Reich Foreign Minister on the   175
               Reception of the Soviet Ambassador
               Ribbentrop  protests  strongly  against  an
          article   entitled  "German  Communists  Against
          Dictate at Compiegne" which appeared in  a  Riga
          newspaper.
Aug. 9    The German Foreign Office to the German Embassy   175
               in the Soviet Union and the German Legation
               in Lithuania
               The  facilities  granted Lithuania  in  the
          Memel Free Port will be discontinued; they would
          lead  to politically dangerous Soviet privileges
          on German territory.
Aug. 13   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         176
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov proposes financial compensation for
          the strip of Lithuanian territory.
Aug. 14   Memorandum by the Reich Foreign Minister          177
               The   Soviet  Ambassador  says   that   the
          newspaper   article,  against  which  Ribbentrop
          protested on August 6, appeared as a result of a
          misunderstanding which will not be repeated.
Aug. 30   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         177
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  submits  a  protest  against   the
          denial  of  the rights of the Lithuanian  Soviet
          Republic in the Memel Free Port Zone.
Aug. 31   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          178
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions to inform Molotov that, by the
          Vienna  Award Germany and Italy have effected  a
          peaceful settlement of the territorial claims of
          Hungary  against Rumania; that Bulgarian  claims
          against  Rumania  are being  settled  by  direct
          negotiations;  that  Germany  and   Italy   have
          guaranteed  the territory of Rumania within  the
          new  frontiers;  and  that Germany  assumes  the
          Soviet Government will welcome this contribution
          to peace.
Sept. 1   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  receives the news  of  the  Vienna
          Award  with  reserve, and points  out  that  the
          U.S.S.R.  had not been consulted as required  in
          questions  of  interest  to  both  countries  by
          article 3 of the Treaty of Non-aggression.

Page XXVII

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                       1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Sept. 3   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          181
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions to inform Molotov  in  writing
          that,  since Soviet interests had been satisfied
          by  the  cession of Bessarabia,  there  were  no
          common interests and therefore no obligation  to
          consult; that the Soviet Government had given no
          notice,  or  only  perfunctory  notice,   before
          acting  in  the  Baltic and in  Bessarabia;  and
          that, without notice, the U.S.S.R. had taken the
          part of Lithuania promised to Germany.
Sept. 4   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         183
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Suggests modifications in statement  to  be
          given to Molotov.
Sept. 5   The German Foreign Office to the German           185
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Soviet Government to be thanked for use  of
          the  base on the Murman Coast, which the  German
          Navy no longer needs.
Sept. 6   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          185
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Approves minor changes in statement  to  be
          given to Molotov.
Sept. 10  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         187
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               On  receipt of statement, Molotov says that
          a  written  reply will be given,  and  maintains
          that  the German actions were not entirely loyal
          since  the  U.S.S.R. is obviously interested  in
          Rumania and Hungary.
Sept. 10  The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         188
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  notes  with  interest  the  German
          willingness   to  surrender,  for   a   suitable
          compensation,   its   territorial    claim    in
          Lithuania.
Sept. 16  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          188
               Ambassador in the  Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to tell Molotov casually,  on
          September 21, that German troops are being moved
          to northern Norway through Finland.
Sept. 16  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          189
               Minister in Finland (Blcher)
               Instructions to inform the Finnish  Foreign
          Secretary  on  September 21 that notice  of  the
          troop movements has been given in Moscow.
Sept. 21  Memorandum by the German Ambassador in the        189
               Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               In   delivering  the  aide-m‚moire   below,
          Molotov repeatedly emphasized that article 3  of
          the  Treaty of Non-aggression could be  annulled
          if it was not satisfactory to Germany.

Page XXVIII

 V. FRICTION IN THE BALTIC AND BALKANS, JUNE 4-SEPTEMBER 21,
                       1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Sept. 21  The People's Commissariat of Foreign Affairs of   190
               the Soviet Union to the German Embassy in
               the Soviet Union
               Aide-m‚moire  (enclosure  to   the   above)
          stating  that  the  U.S.S.R.  has  interests  in
          Hungary  and  Rumania, that the U.S.S.R.  should
          therefore  have  been consulted,  and  that  the
          Soviet Government is prepared to annul or modify
          article 3 if Germany so desires.

  VI. THE U.S.S.R. AND THE THREE POWER PACT, SEPTEMBER 25-
                      NOVEMBER 26, 1940

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Sept. 25  The Reich Foreign Minister to the German Embassy  195
               in the Soviet Union
               Instructions    to   tell   Molotov    that
          warmongering  agitation in America has  resulted
          in  a  military alliance between Germany  Italy,
          and  Japan, which is in no way directed  against
          the U.S.S.R.; and to say that a letter will soon
          be sent to Stalin inviting Molotov to Berlin.
Sept. 26  Foreign Office Memorandum                         196
               Schnurre  states that German deliveries  of
          military  supplies to the U.S.S.R.  are  lagging
          and  that  as a result the suspension of  Soviet
          deliveries  may be expected; Hitler must  decide
          whether German deliveries to the U.S.S.R. are to
          have a priority.
Sept. 27  The German Charge in the Soviet Union             197
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov on hearing of the Three Power Pact,
          requests the text, including any secret clauses;
          he  also  requests  the text  of  the  agreement
          permitting  transit  of  German  troops  through
          Finland,  he  expresses  satisfaction   at   the
          promise  of  a  letter  to  Stalin  and  of   an
          invitation to Berlin.
Sept. 28  Foreign Office Memorandum                         199
               Schnurre   reviews  the   lag   in   German
          deliveries  to Russia, and stresses the  serious
          consequences for the German economy,  if  Soviet
          deliveries should be suspended.
Oct. 2    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German Embassy  201
               in the Soviet Union
               Instructions to give Molotov  the  text  of
          the agreement with Finland; and to tell him that
          the  complete text of the Three Power  Pact  has
          been published, and that, since the Pact was not
          directed  against  the U.S.S.R.,  there  was  no
          obligation to consult.
Oct. 4    The German Charge in the Soviet Union             203
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov requests further information on the
          movement  of German troops through Finland,  and
          says he will study the German views on the Three
          Power Pact.
Oct. 8    Foreign Office Memorandum                         205
               Germany  must  intervene  to  prevent   the
          U.S.S.R.  from gaining control over the  Petsamo
          nickel concession.

Page XXIX

  VI. THE U.S.S.R. AND THE THREE POWER PACT, SEPTEMBER 25-
                 NOVEMBER 26, 1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Oct. 9    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German Embassy  206
               in the Soviet Union
               Casually inform Molotov that rumors of  the
          military occupation of Rumania by German  troops
          are  false; only a German military mission, with
          certain instruction units, has been sent at  the
          request of the Rumanian government.
Oct. 10   The German Charge in the Soviet Union             206
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  listens with interest to  news  of
          the German military mission in Rumania.
Oct. 13   Letter from the Reich Foreign Minister to Stalin  207
               Reviews events since his visit to Moscow in
          August  1939  points out the  gains  which  have
          resulted for both parties from the German-Soviet
          pact,   intimates  the  desirability   of   more
          intimate relations between the U.S.S.R. and  the
          members  of  the Three Power Pact; and  suggests
          that  Molotov visit Berlin to formulate a common
          policy.
Oct. 18   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         214
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Reports  that  he  has  given  Molotov  the
          letter to Stalin.
Oct. 18   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          214
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Requests reason for delivery of the  letter
          to Molotov rather than to Stalin.
Oct. 19   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         215
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  would  have  been  annoyed  at  an
          attempt to give the letter to Stalin, and Stalin
          would  have avoided a personal meeting since  he
          has recently shown a strong reserve in public.
Oct. 22   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         216
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Stalin    thanks   Ribbentrop    for    his
          instructive  analysis  of  recent  events,   and
          agrees  that a further improvement of  relations
          is   possible;   Molotov  accepts   Ribbentrop's
          invitation.
Nov. 2    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         217
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               For the first time, Mikoyan mentions German
          delivery of arms to Finland.
Nov. 12   Memorandum of the Conversation Between the Reich  217
               Foreign  Minister and the Chairman  of  the
               Council  of  People's  Commissars  of   the
               U.S.S.R. and People's Commissar for Foreign
               Affairs, V. M. Molotov, in the Presence  of
               the  Deputy People's Commissar for  Foreign
               Affairs, Dekanosov, as Well as Counselor of
               Embassy  Hilger and Herr Pavlov, Who  Acted
               as Interpreters, Held in Berlin on November
               12, 1940
               Ribbentrop  reviews the military  situation
          to  show  that  Britain is already defeated  and
          states  that Hitler favors an agreement  on  the
          spheres of influence of Germany, Russia,  Italy,
          and  Japan,  Molotov  requests  a  more  precise
          definition   of   the  respective   spheres   of
          influence.

Page XXX

  VI. THE U.S.S.R. AND THE THREE POWER PACT, SEPTEMBER 25-
                 NOVEMBER 26, 1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Nov. 12   Memorandum  of  the  Conversation  Between   the  226
               Fhrer  and the Chairman of the Council  of
               People's  Commissars and People's Commissar
               for   Foreign  Affairs,  Molotov,  in   the
               Presence of the Reich Foreign Minister, the
               Deputy  People's Commissar,  Dekanosov,  as
               Well as of Counselor of Embassy Hilger  and
               Herr Pavlov, Who Acted as Interpreters,  on
               November 12, 1940
               Hitler,  after  an extended review  of  the
          world  situation,  affirms  the  possibility  of
          collaboration  between  the  U.S.S.R.  and   the
          signers  of the Three Power Pact in the task  of
          keeping  America out of Europe;  Molotov  agrees
          that  collaboration  is possible  but  asks  for
          precise  statements on Finland, on  the  Balkans
          and  Turkey, and on the meaning of the New Order
          in Europe and Asia.
Nov. 13   Memorandum of the Conversation Between the        234
               Fhrer and the Chairman of the Council of
               People's Commissars Molotov in the Presence
               of the Reich Foreign Minister and the
               Deputy People's Commissar for Foreign
               Affairs, Dekanosov, as Well as of Counselor
               of Embassy Hilger and Herr Pavlov, Who
               Acted as Interpreters, in Berlin on
               November 13, 1940
               Hitler repeatedly urges an agreement on the
          division of the British Empire; Molotov  insists
          that  there must first be recognition of  Soviet
          interests  in  Finland,  the  Balkans,  and   in
          Turkey.
Nov. 13   Memorandum of the Final Conversation Between      247
               Reich Foreign Minister von Ribbentrop and
               the Chairman of the Council of People's
               Commissars of the U.S.S.R. and People's
               Commissar for Foreign Affairs, Herr
               Molotov, on November 13, 1940
               Ribbentrop outlines a broad division of the
          spheres  of influence of Germany, Italy,  Japan,
          and  the  U.S.S.R., and suggests  the  terms  of
          secret  agreements  defining this  division  and
          bringing the U.S.S.R. into the Three Power Pact;
          Molotov insists on more specific recognition  of
          Soviet  interests in the Baltic, in the Balkans,
          at    the    Straits;   Molotov   approves    of
          collaboration,   but  only  after   a   thorough
          understanding.
Nov. 15   The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  255
               (Weizsacker) to all German Diplomatic
               Missions and the Offices in Paris and
               Brussels
               The  visit  of  Molotov took  place  in  an
          atmosphere of mutual confidence and resulted  in
          agreement on all important questions.
------    Draft Agreement Between the States of the Three   255
               Power Pact, Germany, Italy, and Japan, on
               the One Side, and the Soviet Union on the
               Other Side
               A German draft, providing for the adherence
          of  the  U.S.S.R. to the Three Power  Pact,  and
          including  two secret protocols,  of  which  one
          defines  the spheres of influence of each  power
          and  the  other  provides for  free  passage  of
          Soviet warships through the Straits.

Page XXXI

  VI. THE U.S.S.R. AND THE THREE POWER PACT, SEPTEMBER 25-
                 NOVEMBER 26, 1940-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
NOV. 26   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         258
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  states that the Soviet  Government
          is  prepared  to accept the draft  of  the  Four
          Power  Pact provided German troops are withdrawn
          from  Finland,  provided  Bulgaria  concludes  a
          mutual assistance pact with the U.S.S.R. and the
          U.S.S.R.  acquires a base within  range  of  the
          Straits;   and  provided  Japan  renounces   her
          concessions  in Northern Sakhalin;  he  outlines
          five protocols to include these amendments;  and
          he requests a statement of the German view.

VII. SOVIET RESISTANCE TO THE GERMAN ADVANCE IN THE BALKANS,
              DECEMBER 18, 1940-MARCH 13, 1941

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1940                                                           
Dec. 18   Fhrer's Directive                                260
               Preliminary     plans    for     "Operation
          Barbarossa," to crush the U.S.S.R.  in  a  quick
          campaign.
Dec. 31   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   264
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The  Finnish Minister intimates that German
          assistance is expected in the event of a  future
          conflict with the U.S.S.R.
1941                                                        
Jan. 7    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          264
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg), the German Ambassador in
               Turkey (Papen), the German Minister in
               Yugoslavia (Heeren), and the German
               Minister in Greece (Erbach-Sch”nberg)
               Strong   German  forces  are  moving   into
          Rumania through Hungary, for possible operations
          against  Britain in Greece; a reserved  attitude
          is to be taken in conversation.
Jan. 7    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          266
               Ambassador in Japan (Ott)
               Instructions  to tell the Japanese  Foreign
          Minister  of  transfer of German contingents  to
          Rumania.
Jan. 8    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         266
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Rumors  are  circulating concerning  German
          troops in Rumania.
Jan. 10   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          267
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               If  questioned,  say  troop  movements  are
          directed against the British in Greece.
Jan. 10   Secret Protocol                                   267
               Settlement of the German claim to  a  strip
          of  Lithuanian territory, signed by Molotov  and
          Schulenburg.
Jan 17    The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  268
               (Weizsacker) to the Reich Foreign Minister
               The  Russian Ambassador submits  a  warning
          that  the  appearance of foreign troops  in  the
          territory of Bulgaria and of the Straits will be
          regarded  as  a  violation  of  Soviet  security
          interests.

Page XXXII

VII. SOVIET RESISTANCE TO THE GERMAN ADVANCE IN THE BALKANS,
         DECEMBER 18, 1940-MARCH 13, 1941-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
Jan. 17   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         270
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  expresses surprise that no  answer
          has  been  received to the statement of November
          25  offering Soviet adherence to the Three Power
          Pact,  he  expects  an early reply;  Schulenburg
          states that the issues are under discussion with
          Italy  and  Japan; Molotov repeats  the  warning
          concerning  foreign troops in the  territory  of
          Bulgaria and of the Straits.
Jan. 21   The Reich Foreign Minister to the State           271
               Secretary in the German Foreign Office
               (Weizsacker)
               Instructions   to   inform    the    Soviet
          Ambassador that Germany does not expect  Britain
          to  occupy the Straits, but does expect  Britain
          to seek a foothold in Greece; German troops will
          march through Bulgaria to expel the British. The
          German Government adheres to the views expressed
          to Molotov in Berlin and is discussing Molotov's
          counterproposals with the Italians and Japanese.
Jan. 22   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   273
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Informs the Soviet Ambassador as instructed
          by  Ribbentrop, the Ambassador points  out  that
          this  statement  is  not in agreement  with  the
          Soviet  communication of January l7,  Weizsacker
          states  his  belief that the German  plans  will
          serve Soviet interests.
Jan. 23   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         274
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               A  similar conversation between Molotov and
          Schulenburg.
Feb. 22   The German Foreign Office to the German           274
               Ambassador in the  Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               German military strength in Rumania  is  to
          be made known and even exaggerated.
Feb. 23   The State Secretary in the German Foreign Office  275
               (Weizsacker) to the German Ambassador in
               the Soviet Union (Schulenburg)
               Instructions to challenge, in conversation,
          Greek  reports that British troops  are  not  in
          Greece  and  that  Greece has  rejected  British
          offers to send troops.
Feb. 27   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          276
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions to tell Molotov,  on  February
          28,  that  Bulgaria will join  the  Three  Power
          Pact;  and to tell him, on March 1, that British
          action  in  Greece has forced a  German  advance
          into Bulgaria.
Mar. 1    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         277
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  receives with evident concern  the
          news  that  Bulgaria has adhered  to  the  Three
          Power Pact.
Mar. 1    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         278
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  states that the German  occupation
          of Bulgaria involves injury to Soviet security.

Page XXXIII

VII. SOVIET RESISTANCE TO THE GERMAN ADVANCE IN THE BALKANS,
         DECEMBER 18, 1940-MARCH 13, 1941-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
Mar. 13   Foreign Office Memorandum                         279
               German military authorities state that  the
          presence of the Soviet territorial commission in
          eastern  Germany  can  be permitted  only  until
          March  25;  strong  German  forces  are  already
          assembled there.

VIII. THE SOVIET TREATIES WITH JUGOSLAVIA AND JAPAN, MARCH 25-
                       APRIL 13, 1941

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
Mar. 25   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         280
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Expresses    doubt   that   Matsuoka    was
          completely  frank  in  describing  his  two-hour
          conversation with Stalin and Molotov.
Mar. 27   Memorandum of the Conversation Between the Reich  281
               Foreign Minister and Japanese Foreign
               Minister Matsuoka in the Presence of
               Ambassadors Ott and Oshima at Berlin on
               March 27, 1941
               Ribbentrop  reviews the military  situation
          and  concludes that the Axis has already won the
          war;  he  states that German relations with  the
          U.S.S.R.  are correct, but that Germany  regards
          Soviet policy with suspicion; he suggests that a
          Japanese attack on Singapore would break British
          spirit  and  keep the United States out  of  the
          war.
Mar. 27   Memorandum of the Interview Between the Fhrer    289
               and the Japanese Foreign Minister,
               Matsuoka, in the Presence of the Reich
               Foreign Minister and Ambassadors Ott and
               Oshima, March 27, 1941
               Hitler  argues that the British  have  lost
          the  war, but have not the intelligence to admit
          it;  Matsuoka  expresses regret  that  sentiment
          favorable  to Britain and America has  prevented
          Japanese  action,  but  he expresses  confidence
          that  this  obstacle will be overcome;  Matsuoka
          reports on his discussions in Moscow.
Mar. 28   Memorandum of the Conversation Between the Reich  296
               Foreign Minister and Japanese Foreign
               Minister Matsuoka on March 28, 1941
               Ribbentrop  states  that  read  cooperation
          with  the U.S.S.R. is impossible, and recommends
          that  Matsuoka not discuss the adherence of  the
          U.S.S.R. to the Three Power Pact when he returns
          to Moscow.
Mar. 29   Memorandum of the Conversation Between the Reich  303
               Foreign Minister and Japanese Foreign
               Minister Matsuoka in Berlin on March 29,
               1941
               Ribbentrop  again advises Matsuoka  against
          political  discussions with  the  U.S.S.R.,  and
          promises  German assistance in case of a  Soviet
          attack  on  Japan, he states that a war  between
          Germany   and  the  U.S.S.R.  is  possible   and
          explains why Germany could not accept the  terms
          set by Molotov for Soviet adherence to the Three
          Power  Pact, Matsuoka says that he will have  to
          discuss a non-aggression pact in Moscow.

Page XXXIV

VIII. THE SOVIET TREATIES WITH JUGOSLAVIA AND JAPAN, MARCH 25-
                  APRIL 13, 1941-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
Apr. 4    Memorandum of the Interview Between the Fhrer    311
               and the Japanese Foreign Minister,
               Matsuoka, in the Presence of the Reich
               Foreign Minister and Minister of State
               Meissner at Berlin, April 4, 1941
               Matsuoka  tells  of  his  conversations  in
          Rome;  Hitler promises assistance in case  of  a
          Japanese war with the United States.
Apr. 4    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         316
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  states that a treaty of friendship
          and   non-aggression  would  be  signed  between
          Jugoslavia and the U.S.S.R.; Schulenburg  states
          that the moment chosen is unfortunate and vainly
          urges that the Soviet Government reconsider  the
          matter.
Apr. 5    Foreign Office Memorandum-Memorandum on the       318
               Present Status of Soviet Deliveries of Raw
               Materials to Germany
               After  the  conclusion of the German-Soviet
          Commercial Agreement of January 10, 1941. Soviet
          deliveries  lagged,  probably  because  of   the
          cooling   of  political  relations;   in   March
          deliveries soared, and continue at a high level.
Apr. 6    The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          319
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions  to tell Molotov that  Germany
          is   taking   military  action  in  Greece   and
          Jugoslavia  to  expel the British  from  Greece;
          Germany   has   no   political  or   territorial
          interests  in the Balkans and will withdraw  the
          German troops when their task is finished.
Apr. 6    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         320
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  expresses regret at the spread  of
          war.
Apr. 9    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         321
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               In   several  conversations,  he  has  been
          unable  to  get  from Matsuoka a straightforward
          statement regarding Matsuoka's conversation with
          Molotov.
Apr. 10   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         321
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               A  Japanese-Soviet neutrality pact  may  be
          signed.
Apr. 13   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         322
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Matsuoka says that the Neutrality Pact will
          probably be signed this afternoon.
Apr. 13   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         323
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Describes  Stalin's  demonstration  of  his
          desire  for  German friendship at  the  railroad
          station when Matsuoka was departing.

Page XXXV

 IX. THE FAILURE OF EFFORTS TO PRESERVE PEACE, APRIL 15-JUNE
                          22, 1941

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
Apr. 15   The German Charge in the Soviet Union             325
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               Sobolev accepts the German position on  the
          demarcation  of the German-Soviet boundary,  and
          requests that mixed commissions fix the boundary
          at  once,  Tippelskirch warns  that  any  German
          delay will arouse Soviet mistrust.
Apr. 16   The German Charge in the Soviet Union             326
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               The   Japanese-Soviet  Pact,  and  Stalin's
          actions at the rail road station are interpreted
          as   evidence   of  a  desire  for   Soviet-Axis
          cooperation.
Apr. 18   Protocol on the Outcome of the Conference         326
               Between the Plenipotentiaries of the
               Government of the German Reich and the
               Government of the Union of the Soviet
               Socialist Republics To Inquire Into the
               Observance of the Commercial Agreement
               Between Germany and the Union of Soviet
               Socialist Republics of February 11, 1940
               Gives the total of Soviet deliveries.
Apr. 22   The German Charge in the Soviet Union             328
               (Tippelskirch) to the German Foreign Office
               Reports    a   formal   complaint   against
          violations  of  the  Soviet frontier  by  German
          planes.
Apr. 23   The High Command of the Armed Forces to the       329
               German Foreign Office
               Complains  of  violations  of  the   German
          frontier by Soviet planes.
Apr. 24   The Naval Attach‚ of the German Embassy in the    330
               Soviet Union (Baumbach) to the Naval High
               Command
               Rumors  of a German-Soviet war are  fed  by
          travelers  from Germany, the British  Ambassador
          predicts the outbreak for June 22.
Apr. 28   Conversation of the Fhrer with the Ambassador    330
               Count von der Schulenburg, on April 28,
               1941
               Schulenburg  argues that the U.S.S.R.  will
          not   attack  Germany,  but  rather  wishes   to
          cooperate  with  the  Axis and  will  make  even
          further  concessions to Germany;  Hitler  argues
          that the U.S.S.R. cannot be trusted.
Apr. 28   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   333
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Argues  that  war with the  U.S.S.R.  would
          give  Britain  new moral strength,  and  that  a
          German  advance even to Moscow and beyond  would
          not  bring  peace but instead would prolong  the
          war   and   sacrifice  the  economic  advantages
          Germany now derives from peace with the U.S.S.R.
May 2     The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         334
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Every  traveler to Moscow brings rumors  of
          war, supported by facts.

Page XXXVI

 IX. THE FAILURE OF EFFORTS TO PRESERVE PEACE, APRIL 15-JUNE
                     22, 1941-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
May 4     The German Foreign Office to the German           334
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Instructions for combating rumors of war.
May 7     The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         335
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Believes  Stalin has taken the chairmanship
          of the Council of People's Commissars because he
          wishes  to  develop good relations with  Germany
          and  because  he  feels Molotov  has  failed  to
          achieve this goal.
May 12    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         336
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Maintains  that recent events  fortify  the
          belief  that  Stalin  took the  chairmanship  in
          order to avert a war with Germany.
May 13    The German Consul at Harbin (Ponschab) to the     339
               German Foreign Office
               Gives  the  text  of an intercepted  Soviet
          dispatch warning that Germany may force a war.
May 15    Foreign Office Memorandum                         339
               Schnurre gives a summary of recent  German-
          Soviet commercial negotiations and of Soviet raw
          material  deliveries, he believes  that  Germany
          could ask even larger deliveries.
May 15    The German Foreign Office to the German           341
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Reports  of frontier violations  by  German
          planes are being investigated.
May 16    The German Minister in Sweden (Wied) to the       342
               German Foreign Office
               Minister Kollontay on forces massed on  the
          western frontier of the U.S.S.R.
May 17    Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   342
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               Oshima  asks about German-Soviet  relations
          and receives an evasive reply.
May 17    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         343
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Sobolev says frontier violations by  German
          planes are continuing.
May 24    The German Foreign Office to the German           343
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               Demarcation  of the German-Soviet  boundary
          will be arranged shortly, Woermann explains that
          the  purpose  of this telegram  is  to  delay  a
          survey of the boundary by a mixed commission.
May 24    The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         344
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Argues  that  Soviet policy is directed  at
          the avoidance of a conflict with Germany.

Page XXXVII

 IX. THE FAILURE OF EFFORTS TO PRESERVE PEACE, APRIL 15-JUNE
                     22, 1941-Continued

Date       Subject                                          Pag
                                                              e
1941                                                           
June 14   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         346
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  gives the text of a Tass  dispatch
          denying  rumors  of an impending  break  between
          Germany and the U.S.S.R.
June 15   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          346
               Minister in Hungary (Erdmannsdorff)
               Hungary  is  to be prepared for  a  German-
          Soviet break.
June 21   The Reich Foreign Minister to the German          347
               Ambassador in the Soviet Union
               (Schulenburg)
               The text of the German declaration of war.
June 21   Letter from Hitler to Mussolini                   349
               Defending   the  decision  to  attack   the
          U.S.S.R.
June 21   Memorandum by the State Secretary in the German   353
               Foreign Office (Weizsacker)
               The   Soviet  Ambassador  protests  against
          frontier violations by German planes; Weizsacker
          maintains   that   there  have  been   wholesale
          violations by Soviet planes; the formal  protest
          is attached.
June 22   The German Ambassador in the Soviet Union         355
               (Schulenburg) to the German Foreign Office
               Molotov  asks  an  explanation  for  German
          dissatisfaction with the U.S.S.R., he wishes  to
          know  what  has caused the present situation  in
          German-Soviet  relations,  Schulenburg  says  he
          cannot  answer  because he lacks  the  pertinent
          information.
June 22   Memorandum of the Conversation Between the Reich  356
               Foreign Minister and Soviet Russian
               Ambassador Dekanosov in the Foreign Office
               at 4 a. m. on June 23 [1941]
               Ribbentrop announces that Germany has begun
          hostilities.


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