The Nizkor Project: Remembering the Holocaust (Shoah)

Shofar FTP Archive File: orgs/international/red-cross/extermination


From: Annie Alpert 
Newsgroups: alt.revisionism
Subject: Re: Red Cross & Auschwitz
Date: Thu, 03 Apr 1997 09:54:24 -0500
Organization: http://www.intac.com/~miasaura
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John Royle wrote:
> 
> What is the truth about the claim that the red cross visited Auschwitz in
> 1944 & found no evidence of gas chambers.


The IRC delegates were expressly forbidden from visiting the Auschwitz
Krema, where the gas chambers and creamation facilities were. They were
taken only to those parts of the huge complex which housed prisoners who
were not to be exterminated. Some Allied POWs were held in Auschwitz, in
reasonable conditions, but they knew about the gassings and mentioned
them to the IRC delegate. For more information, read "The Report of the
International Committee of the Red Cross ICRC) on its Activities during
the Second World War" (Geneva, 1948).

In addition, former SS-Untersturmfuehrer Dr. Hans Mnch confirmed this
in his    testimony at the International Nuremberg Trial (Trial of the
Major War Criminals,     1948, Vol. VIII, p. 313-321). He said: 

        I repeatedly witnessed guided tours of civilians and also of
commissions of
          the Red Cross and other parties within the camp, and I was
able to
          ascertain that the camp leadership arranged it masterfully to
conduct these
          guided tours in such a way that the people being guided around
did not
          see anything about inhuman treatment. The main camp was shown
only
          and in this main camp there were so-called show blocks,
particularly
          block 13, that were especially prepared for such guided tours
and that
          were equipped like a normal soldier's barracks with beds that
had sheets
          on them, and well-functioning washrooms. 

 Survivor, Fanie Fennelon of the Women's Orchestra in Auschwitz tells a
story about an IRC visit in her book "Playing for Time".  She tells how
the prisoners were issued new blankets and other things just before the
visit.  Those blankets were taken away the day the IRC left.

The ICRC report is very clear regarding Nazi atrocities; for instance,
in page 641 of vol. 1, the report states that the Jews were "outcasts
condemned by rigid racial legislation to suffer tyranny, persecution,
and systematic extermination". It goes on to say "they were penned
into concentration camps and ghettos, recruited for forced labor, 
subjected to grave brutalities and sent to death camps". Another
verbatim quote is the following (in the same page):

"During the period in September 1940, when the 'Iron Guard' supported
by the Gestapo and the German SS had seized power, the Jews had been
subjected to persecution and deported to death camps".

and from vol. 2, page 514

"In Germany and her satellite countries, the lot of the civilians
belonging to this group was by far the worst. Subjected as they were
to a discriminatory regime, which aimed more or less openly at their
extermination, they were unable to procure the necessities of life".


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